Scholastic

The Librarians Recommend...

  • The Librarians Recommend…Back to School Excitement

    It’s hard to see the summer end, but students streaming back into the classroom gets our librarians excited to book-talk students and hand-sell their favorite picks to teachers. They know some kids haven’t cracked a cover over the entire break, but these educators have been making stacks of their favorite brand-new titles.
  • The Librarians Recommend...Graphic Novels

    The graphic novel shelves in middle school libraries may be the most popular section in the library. And, happily, with the recent surge of wonderful graphic novels written for elementary students, collections there are getting just as much traffic.

    Like books in any format, graphic novels vary in quality but most offerings from the major publishers offer a complex and challenging reading experience and have the added attraction of being highly appealing. Initially boys were the primary fans but that has changed lately with more books appearing that feature girls as major characters.

    Most graphic novels are published in paperback at a reasonable price, making it possible to include them in classroom libraries. With so many outstanding offerings, the hardest choice is not whether to include them but which ones to add!
  • What Role Do Librarians Play When it Comes to the CCSS?

    A school librarian’s job description is what the CCSS are all about! This is what we do and have done and I am really excited that the educational pendulum has swung back to an inquiry and process model. It’s a wonderful opportunity for school librarians to step up and do what we do best: collaborate with teachers on units of study, co-teach, provide expertise on materials and resources, assist and instruct students on research skills, and support the learning process.

    One of the things that concerns me is that as school librarians have been marginalized in so many districts, teachers either won’t have a building librarian or won’t have had any experience with the help they can provide. In our district, for example, elementary librarians now spend most of their day teaching technology skills and the secondary librarians each serve two enormous buildings. In many districts, there are no professional librarians at all.
  • Ask the Librarians: What Books Are You Most Thankful For This Year?

    I read far and wide. How can I possibly narrow it down to one book? Just ONE BOOK? Really? However, in 2012, I want everyone to ask me the last question. I want to climb to the top of the Chrysler Building and shout at the top of my lungs “Dear World: I am thankful for Katherine Applegate’s THE ONE AND ONLY IVAN. If I were a rich man, I would give away ten million copies.”

    However, in 2012, I want everyone to ask me the last question. I want to climb to the top of the Chrysler Building and shout at the top of my lungs “Dear World: I am thankful for Katherine Applegate’s THE ONE AND ONLY IVAN. If I were a rich man, I would give away ten million copies.” I want to plaster stickers all over my body that read, “Please visit your local independent bookshop to purchase a copy THE ONE AND ONLY IVAN. It will touch your heart.” I want to hoist a billboard above Broadway that advertises Katherine Applegate’s masterpiece.
  • Achieve Author Visits on a Budget

    Normally I would say ask your public library to help, but those budgets are getting slashed too! But together, and with some creativity, you can still make these happen. Here are a few ideas:

    Check with “local” authors. Local can mean anywhere within driving distance, so look beyond your state, too. While gas prices are still rising, it could still be more economical than paying for airfare. And, if they live close enough, they may not require lodging.

    YALSA has an “Authors by State” resource on their wiki. This is one place to start. You can also check with regional writers and illustrators groups.
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